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Review: Colossal

In cinemas: April 13, 2017
Starring: Anne Hathaway, Jason Sudeikis, Dan Stevens
Director: Nacho Vigalondo

In a world of people growing tired of Hollywood’s endless sequels and remakes arrives the film no one saw coming: a kaiju genre hybrid in which Anne Hathaway unwittingly destroys a city in South Korea with a Godzilla-type monster she controls whilst drunk. That’s not a joke.

Functional alcoholic Gloria (Hathaway) is suffering a midlife crisis following the loss of her job, boyfriend and apartment, due to her partying lifestyle. She moves from New York City back to her small, dreary hometown, unaware that the decision will wreak havoc on the other side of the world.

Upon her arrival she rekindles a childhood friendship with Oscar (Jason Sudeikis), who happens to own a bar - super great. Drunkenly stumbling home after the unsurprising outcome of that tryst, Gloria discovers that when she walks through a certain part of town at a specific time, a monster that has begun materialising in South Korea mimics her exact movements. And so, a woman who can barely keep her own life together is controlling a humongous behemoth attacking the city of Seoul. Again: super great.

Gloria soon realises that her drunken misbehaviour and beastly party trick can cause a monumental number of deaths, so she tries to make things right... but there’s someone in town trying to drag her back towards her old ways.

It may sound like a recipe for disaster, but Spanish director Nacho Vigalondo (the man behind thrillers Timecrimes and Open Windows) somehow pulls it off. Meshing the genres of comedy, drama, thriller and monster film together, Colossal has only a couple of plot holes to its composition.

Funnyman Sudeikis will keep you on your toes in one of his most stimulating roles to date, while Hathaway gives the performance we’ve been hoping for after a string of bland characters. The film takes numerous unexpected paths, weighing its themes of  addiction and abuse in intriguing ways, and the special effects are just downright cool for a film of its budget.

Colossal is a huge, positive surprise, and one thing is for sure: you’ve never seen anything quite like it.

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